Take a Walk | Opening Act(ivity)

Hi, my name is Lisa. I host the Opening Act(ivity) on Wednesday mornings at our Northtown location. While we are social distancing, we are bringing the activities to you!

Today’s activity involves a field trip and a scavenger hunt.  Please visit one of Spokane’s local neighborhood districts. Take a walk through the district and find words/objects that begin with the letters A-Z.

Please consider supporting businesses in the area.



Coming Soon: RBDigital Audiobooks Moving to OverDrive/Libby App

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Later this year, Spokane Public Library will be moving our digital ebooks and audiobooks from RBdigital to the Libby app as part of our OverDrive collection. You will continue to be able to browse, borrow, and enjoy all the same great ebooks and audiobooks you loved in the RBdigital app, now available in Libby. If you have already been enjoying the Libby app, there will be no change, other than you may notice even more great titles available for you to borrow.

Transition from RBdigital
If you currently have a book checked out in the RBdigital app, it will be available through the remainder of the lending period, so you can finish your title without disruption or risk of losing your place in the book. Holds will not be moved, but you may export your Transaction History from the Profiles section of the RBdigital app. You can place holds on those titles again in Libby. For the time being, you can continue to use the RBdigital app to access magazines.

Getting Started with Libby
Our library is proud to continue to offer you a wide selection of digital titles for you to access anytime, anywhere through Libby, the one-tap reading app. If you haven’t tried the Libby app yet, all you need to get started is your library card number and PIN number. The Libby app is easy to use and will guide you through the setup process and get you connected to our library in just a few minutes.

New to ebooks and audiobooks?
In just a few taps, you can start reading or listening instantly on your phone or tablet. The digital library is available 24/7 without leaving home and is free from our library. Choose from bestsellers, fiction, nonfiction, books for kids, and more. Download the Libby app today.



Books with Letters

Do you have a favorite word? I have several. I love the word viscosity (especially when it refers to chocolate milkshakes). I also love the word epistolary. It means “related to the writing of letters.” When paired with novels – “epistolary novels,” it means that the novel is written in letters. As an avid letter-writer myself these books appeal greatly to me. The definition of an epistolary novel can be stretched to include books where the “letters” are diary entries or text messages between friends or letters never sent. Check out my video on correspondence here for inspiration to write your own letters and check out some of my favorite epistolary novels here!


guernseyThe Guernsey Literary Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows is probably one of the best-known epistolary novels and I resisted reading it for quite some time because it was so popular. I don’t know why because it was charming, and I LOVED it. The movie version is excellent as well!

ellaYou have to say the title of Ella Minnow Pea by Mark Dunn out loud to get it and how it works in this sweet book about a community, the alphabet, and how their lives are affected by it. This would be a great read for teens, also.

A great way to introduce younger children to letter writing is through Alma Flor Ada’s sweet books where classic characters write to one another. Check out Yours Truly, Goldilocks to start.

I happened upon Letters of a Woman Homesteader by Eleanor Pruitt Steward while looking for books that could be read on KPBX’s Bookshelf program. This fascinating account of a woman’s time in Wyoming in 1909 opens a window to a world so different than today’s one of convenience and comfort! Check out a copy or listen to the reading on KPBX.

84I read 84, Charing Cross Road by Helene Hanff in one sitting not because it’s short but because I was so charmed by the characters in this actual correspondence between a writer in NY and the staff of a London bookshop over the course of 40 years.

What’s next for you? Writing some letters or reading some letters? Do you have any great epistolary novels to recommend?


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Coffee or Crafting | Opening Act(ivity)

Coffee or Crafting:  How about both?

Here is a way to enjoy your cup of joe with a splash of creativity. I’m a fan of using different items to create art. For today’s activity, we will be using watercolor paper, coffee, Qtips, plastic forks, and chopsticks. As your painting dries, there will be subtle changes.

Thanks Jordan and Tanya for joining me at the craft table!

 



Memorable Trips | Opening (Act)ivity

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I’m Lisa from the Northtown Library. I usually host the Opening Act(ivity) program on Wednesday mornings, though today we are bringing the activity to you!

Today’s activity has to do with travel. I know a lot of us are staying close to home, so grab a favorite vacation photo.

  1. Write down all that you can remember from that vacation.
  2. Plan the most outrageous trip you can imagine.

Instead of buying postcards on my last trip, I decided to draw my own pictures while I was there.

It is a wonderful way to soak up the atmosphere. This one is from Ocean Shores.



Reading for Fun

Reading for fun? What is that?! As a student and an only-parent, it is difficult to find time to enjoy reading for pleasure. There is always another assigned chapter to read, home distractions and dishes to do that fill my spare time, however, I managed to do it! I not only finished a book, There, There by Tommy Orange, but I have started another book, Akata Witch by Nnedi Okorafor. 

Both books bring me out of my reading comfort-zone and into eye-opening, fascinating reads. While I was introduced to Tommy Orange’s book through an optional lecture at the university, I found Nnedi Okorafor through our reading lists. I am thoroughly enjoying the writing style of Okorafor – the magical world that exists alongside the “normal” world as it is set in Nigeria – compared to what I generally read in sci-fi/fantasy books. I read wherever I can, including my own backyard (Bonus: this earns a Read Outside badge for the library’s summer reading program).

 

If you can, take the time to look over our reading lists and find something that you can read for the love of reading. It will take you out of your comfort zone and into a new reading realm!



Imagine Your Story | Reading List for Kids and Teens

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Check out our fantasy adventure reading list to fit this year’s summer reading theme, Imagine Your Story!

Picture Books   

Another by Christian Robinson  

Book | eBook 

Day Dreamers: A Journey of Imagination by Emily Winfield Martin  

Book 

Journey by Aaron Becker  

Book 

Little Barbarian by Renato Moriconi 

Book 

Julian is a Mermaid by Jessica Love  

Book| eBook

Not a Box by Antoinette Portis   

Book 

Not Quite Narwhal by Jessie Sima 

Book  

The Very Last Castle by Travis Jonker   

Book | eBook 

The Wall in the Middle of the Book by Jon Agee   

Book | eBook 

 

Middle Grade

Cardboard Kingdom by Chad Sell   

Book | eBook 

Charlie Hernández and the League of Shadows by Ryan Calejo 

Book 

Dragon Pearl by Yoon Ha Lee 

Book | eBook 

Furthermore by Tahereh Mafi   

Book 

Race to the Sun by Rebecca Roanhorse  

Book | eBook 

Shuri: A Black Panther Novel by Nic Stone  

Audiobook 

Snow & Rose by Emily Winfield Martin   

Book 

The Girl Who Drank the Moon by Kelly Barnhill  

Book | eBook 

The Princess in Black by Shannon Hale, Dean Hale Illustrated by LeUyen Pham  

Book | eBook 

Tristan Strong Punches a Hole in the Sky by Kwame Mbalia   

Book | eBook

 

YA  

A Blade So Black by L.L. McKinney  

Book | Audiobook 

Beasts Made of Night by Tochi Onyebuchi 

Book 

Cinder by Marissa Meyer 

Book | eBook | Audiobook 

Flame in the Mist by Renée Ahdieh 

Book | eBook | Audiobook 

Geekerella by Ashley Poston 

Book | eBook 

Girls Made of Snow and Glass by Melissa Bashardoust 

Book | Audiobook 

Slay by Brittany Morris  

Book | eBook  

The Belles by Dhonielle Clayton  

Book | eBook | Audiobook 

The Gilded Wolves by Roshami Chokshi  

Book | eBook | Audiobook 

The Hazel Wood by Melissa Albert   

Book | eBook | Audiobook 

The Sleeper and the Spindle by Neil Gaiman 

Book | eBook | Audiobook 

The Wrath & the Dawn Renée Ahdieh 

Book | eBook 

Thorn by intisar khanani 

Audiobook 

Uprooted by Namoi Novik  

Book | eBook 

Warcross by Marie Lu 

Book | eBook 

We Set the Dark on Fire by Tehlor Kay Meja  

Book | eBook | Audiobook 

Wintersong by S. Jae-jones 

Book 

 

 

 



Quilting Ideas | Opening Act(ivity)

My name is Lisa and I work at the Northtown Library. I host the Opening Act(ivity) program typically every Wednesday mornings. Since we are closed for now, we are bringing the Opening Act(ivity) to you!

For today’s activity, I want to share one of my favorite quilts that I made depicting a charm bracelet. Customize your own quilted charm bracelet to reflect your style!

 



eBook Bingo

Explore free ebooks from Spokane Public Library, all summer long. Start by downloading the Libby app to download eBooks on the go and play book bingo with your friends and family!

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Summer is Here! | Books for Kids and Teens

 

 

Picture Books

A Big Mooncake for Little Star by Grace Lin

Book | eBook

Carmela Full of Wishes by Matt De La Peña, illustrated by Christian Robinson

Book | eBook

Hey, Water! by Antoinette Portis

Book | eBook

How to Code a Sandcastle by Josh Funk, Illustrated by Sara Palacios

Book

I Got the Rhythm by Connie Schofield-Morrison, illustrated by Frank Morrison

Book

Jabari Jumps by Gaia Cornwall

Book

Mae Among the Stars by Roda Ahmed, illustrated by Stasia Burrington

Book

My Papi Has a Motorcycle by Isabel Quintero, illustrated by Zeke Peña

Book | Audiobook | Movie

Saturday by Oge Mora

Book

The Old Truck by Jerrett Pumphrey Illustrated by Jerome Pumphrey

Book

They Say Blue by Jillian Tamaki

Book | eBook

 

Middle Grade

Be Prepared by Vera Brosgol

Book

The Cardboard Kingdom by Chad Sell

Book | eBook

Dactyl Hill Squad by Daniel José Older

Book

Front Desk by Kelly Yang

Book | eBook

Hello, Universe by Erin Entrada Kelly

Book | eBook | Audiobook

I Can Make This Promise by Christine Day

Book | eBook | Audiobook

My Life as an Ice Cream Sandwich by Ibi Zoboi

Book

One Crazy Summer by Rita Williams-Garcia (Gr 4-7)

Book | eBook

Parker Inheritance by Varian Johnson

Book | Audiobook

Roller Girl by Victoria Jamieson

Book

Sisters by Raina Telgemeier

Book | eBook

Stand Up, Umi Chung by Jessica Kim

Book on order

The Bridge Home by Padma Venkatrama

Book | eBook

The Last Day of Summer by L.R. Giles

Book

The Season of Styx Malone by Kekla Magoon

Book

Woke: A Young Poet’s Call to Justice by Mahogany L. Browne

Book

 

Young Adult

Aurora Rising by Amie Kaufman

Book | eBook

Carry On by Rainbow Rowell

eBook | Audiobook

Children of Virtue and Vengeance by Tomi Adeyemi

Book | eBook

Like a Love Story by Abdi Nazemian

Book | Audiobook

Lumberjanes: Beware the Kitten Holy by Noelle Stevens

Book

No One Here is Lonely by Sarah Everett

Book

Opposite of Always by Justin A. Reynolds

Book | eBook | Audiobook

Shadowshaper by Daniel José Older

Book | Audiobook

Starfish by Akemi Dawn Bowman

Book

Summer of Jordi Perez (and the best burger in Los Angeles) by Amy Spalding

Book

The Love & Lies of Rukhsana Ali by Sabina Khan

Book | Audiobook

The Toll by Neal Schusterman

Book | eBook

When Dimple Met Rishi by Sandhya Menon

Book | eBook | Audiobook

 



Napkin Roses | Opening Act(ivity)

Want to learn how to make a napkin rose? Learn with our Northtown staff as they present this Opening Act(ivity). This program is usually held at Northtown on Monday mornings but while we are closed, we are bringing the activities to you.

 

Lisa



Concrete Poetry | Opening Act(ivity)

Hi, my name is Lisa. I host the Opening Act(ivity) program at the Northtown Branch.

Today’s activity is writing a concrete poem using Shakespeare or a favorite author.


concretepoetryConcrete poetry—sometimes also called ‘shape poetry‘—is poetry whose visual appearance matches the topic of the poem.

The words form shapes which illustrate the poem’s subject as a picture, as well as through their literal meaning.